Absolute Power Corrupts Absolutely (A Quote)

This was a best-known quote of the 19th century British politician, historian, and moralist Lord John Emerich Edward Dalberg Acton 1834-1902, in a letter to Bishop Mandell Creighton in 1887.  But, he was borrowing from other speakers or writers who earlier said it differently.

A king was the one with the most wealth and power.  This person thinks that all in their “kingdom” are pawns to do with as they please and they’ve done it so long that they believe their own hype.    They rule by threats, coercion, bargaining, murder, and compensating.   “…this option to impose on without any regard whatsoever for due process, becomes, in the hands of most, a license to harm, if not destroy the careers and lives of others.  Leadership incompetence” 1

“Absolute monarchies are those in which all power is given to, or as is more often the case, taken by, the monarch.   Examples were Roman emperors who thought they were gods and Napoleon Bonaparte who declared himself emperor”.2

There’s no room for absolute power in a democracy of checks and balances.  As seen recently, if you act only to build your own wealth, it will eventually come back to bite you in the behind.

As in the movie, The Man Who Would Be King (1975), based on Rudyard Kipling’s 1888 original story, two con men (Carnehan and Dravot, “British adventurers in British India”) sought their fortune in a foreign country, Afghanistan.   They were fellow freemasons to the journalist that they convinced to help them with their research.  They started out by helping people who were warring against each other and came up with satisfactory solutions.   But, then they went a few steps too far by becoming kings themselves over people whose customs they didn’t understand.

Since the holy men who lorded over all the local tribes declared Dravot (Sean Connery) a descendant of  a God because of the freemason symbol he wore around his neck, he basically was thought to be a God for a few months until he told the holy men that he was going to marry a local girl and father children.  The local girl was instructed to bite Dravot on the face causing him to bleed.  Seeing Dravot bleed, the holy men knew he was not a God, and executed him.

Two years later Carnehan (Michael Caine) returned to the journalist.   They had paid for their deceit.  Carnehan had been tortured, crippled, and released.   But, he showed the journalist (Christopher Plummer) the skeletal head of Dravot that was still wearing his golden crown.

Both actors did a wonderful job, especially Sean Connery’s character explaining that he felt this Godship was his calling, and he intended to mend his ways.   Had they left with the spoils before they were outed, as Carnehan wanted to do, they would have been wealthy men.   But, Dravot believed his own hype.

And, now we have another example of absolute power in the case of the Saudi Arabian American journalist executed in the Saudi consulate in Turkey recently.    He was the  same journalist who accompanied President 45’s business dealers to Saudi Arabia on past trips.  And, don’t forget the arms deal President 45 already made with the Saudis.

Sources:

  1. Dr. Robert Aziz, Huffington Post, https://m.huffpost.com
  2. Absolute Power Corrupts Absolutely (A Quote), https://www.phrases.org.uk
  3. Wikipedia, Rudyard Kipling, The Phantom ‘Rickshaw and other Eerie Tales

Submitted by Rosa L. Griffin

 

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Fun Facts to Know and Tell About Baltimore 

Baltimore City is an independent city (meaning it’s not part of any county).   As such, it is the largest independent city in the U.S.

Snowballs/snowcones were invented in Baltimore during the Industrial Revolution.

The Great Baltimore Fire of 1904 burned for 30 hours, during which it destroyed 1,500 buildings and leveled entire neighborhoods.  One of the reasons cited for the widespread destruction was mismatched hose couplings that impeded fire-fighting efforts.  As a result of the Great Baltimore Fire, firefighting equipment was standardized across the United States.

The first dental school in the world was founded in Baltimore in 1840.

Baltimore has more statues and monuments per capita than any other city in the U.S.

The first telegraph line in the world was established between Washington, D.C., and Baltimore in 1844.

Source:   See the rest of the article, “Fun Facts to Know and Tell About Baltimore”, in the free Baltimore Beacon, August 2018, Arts & Style, pages 22 and 25.

Did you know?  A Friend in Sports Radio

Andre A. Melton has a sports show on WEAA 88.9 FM.   He was present when Odessa Rose spoke with gratitude about her thanks to the many Black Writers’ Guild of Maryland’s members who came to the premiere of her movie, Water in a Broken Glass, at the Senator on March 1, 2018.

Andre says that he tries to put at least one item of a general nature in with the sports on each show.  So, listen up—you don’t know what he may be talking about next.

Email:  anmel1@morgan.edu

Phone:  443-825-7857

Fax:  443-885-8206

1700 E. Cold Spring Lane

New Communications, Suite 300

Baltimore, MD  21251

 

Written by Rosa L. Griffin

Did you know? Escarpment

I found out that an escarpment is “a steep slope or long cliff that forms as an effect of faulting or erosion and separates two relatively level areas of differing elevations.”  There are escarpments in Niagara, Southern Africa, Caprock, Catskills, Bandiagara, Helderberg, and Knobstone, to name a few.

Guess where I heard the word escarpment?  In a Tarzan movie, “Tarzan’s N. Y. Adventure” (1942) in which Tarzan and Jane’s “adopted” son, Boy (Johnny Sheffield), is kidnapped by hunters who work for circus people and were given a deadline to leave by Tarzan.   So, Jane (Maureen O’Sullivan), Tarzan (Johnny Weismuller), and Cheetah (chimpanzee) get to go to America.

Tarzan is based on a character created by Edgar Rice Burroughs.  And, in spite of 12 movies, Tarzan still never learned to speak more than a 2-3 word sentence, i.e. “Jane go”, “Boy no go”, etc.   Yet, he knew the word “escarpment”.

Johnny Weismuller was “one of the world’s fastest swimmers in the 20s, winning five Olympic gold medals and one bronze for water polo.  He won 52 U.S. national championships and set more than 50 world records.   His character’s distinctive Tarzan yell is still often used in films.”  A heartbreaking fact is that he had a heart condition that was revealed when he broke a hip and a leg in 1974 causing declining health, but he got a 21-gun salute at his funeral in 1984.

That’s where the sexy comes in—right?  You want a relatively muscular man who’s scantily clad, can rescue you if you are drowning, can keep the “animals” in check, brings home the “bacon”, and protects his home.    And, if you can’t have a kid in the plot because the studio says you are already living in sin, you can always wait for a kid to survive a plane crash in one of the movies, so you can “adopt” him or her.

Sources:

Wikipedia

IMDb

Rotten Tomatoes

 

Written by Rosa L. Griffin

Did You Know?   Job Trend Sources

Most business journals or magazines have articles on job trends that are developing now or in the next 5-10 years.    Are you afraid to get out of your field?    Study everything on the subject first so you will know what to expect if and when you change fields.

Websites

www.WorldWideLearn.com

“Understanding some of the trends that shape the job market can help narrow your search.  If you are looking for job security and growth, you’ll want to focus on the industries that are adding the most new jobs in the next decade.”

www.Salary.com

https://www.bls.gov/ces/           The Bureau of Labor Statistics

Magazines/Journals

  • Entrepreneur
  • Forbes
  • Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco
  • Fast Company
  • Inc.
  • USA Today
  • Fortune
  • The Atlantic

Books

Your local library has thousands of books on topics such as becoming:

  • Molecular biologists
  • Sports medicine doctors
  • Software developers
  • Chefs
  • Life guards
  • Midwives
  • Actors
  • Singers
  • Dancers

You name it—the library has a book for that!   What one library branch doesn’t have—another branch does and your library can order it!   I love libraries! My first job was as a page in the Enoch Pratt Free Library in my East Baltimore neighborhood.  The library is where I became fascinated with books and journals.   I ended up working in libraries for most of my life.

The Occupational Outlook Handbook is published by the Bureau of Labor Statistics and was one of my favorite books to look at when I worked in a college library.  It gave career information on duties, education, training, pay, and job outlook for a multitude of careers.

Here’s another interesting book:

Top 100 Careers Without A Four-Year Degree:  Your Complete Guidebook to Good Jobs in Many Fields, by Laurence Shatkin

Submitted by Rosa L. Griffin

 

 

Did you know? Free Annual Credit Reports

That you can get a FREE copy of each of your 3 credit reports (Equifax, TransUnion, and Experian) once every year?

Go to http://www.annualcreditreport.com.        You can even get your credit score for under $10.

However, they suggest that you not create your account on mobile devices.   Also, Equifax recently had a huge hacking incident.   See Katie Lobosco’s CNN article https://www.google.com/amp/s/amp.cnn.com/money/2017/09/07/pf/victim-equifax-hack-how-to-find-out/index.html to find out if your account was hacked.